A Vagabond Life

Our view can change when we want it to!

Author: Rick (Page 2 of 3)

Day 121: The November Blog

We intended to blog more often than once per month. Where does the time go? Here’s what we’ve been up to since leaving Corpus Christi in mid-October.

We first stopped at our old stomping ground in Medina, Texas, where we caught up with friends and attended the wedding of Tim and Gali Showell. It was a gala country wedding with Travis Klaassen performing the ceremony.

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Medina is also building a new fire house and we saw the building being framed. This was a long time coming. I was in the fire department as a board member five years ago when a new fire house was in the wishful thinking stage. Communities like Medina have no local government funding for their departments. All the money comes from the local community and an occasional grant from the forestry service. Kudo’s to Medina!

We headed west after leaving Medina. How far west was still unknown at the time. We needed to decide where to spend the winter.  Wherever we ended up was going to be on US soil, have a reasonably warm climate, and decent shopping. We turned the trailer toward the setting sun and off we rolled!

One of our favorite stops along the route was in Fort Davis, Texas. This mountainous area is a blend of drop-dead gorgeous scenery, frontier military history and recent space-age technology.

Fort Davis was formally a rough-and-tumble boarder settlement originally known as Chihuahua.  The military post of Fort Davis was established on the site of an earlier Indian village called Painted Comanche Camp. The National Park Service calls Fort Davis one of the best surviving examples of an Indian Wars’ frontier military post in the Southwest. From 1854 to 1891, the fort protected emigrants, mail coaches, and freight wagons on the Trans-Pecos portion of the San Antonio-El Paso Road and on the Chihuahua Trail. This road was also used extensively by prospectors heading west seeking their fortune during the California Gold Rush. Now it was our stop west.

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Old becomes new about 20 miles northwest of Camp Davis at the site of the McDonald Observatory. The site is part of the University of Texas at Austin, College of Natural Sciences. Davis Mountains offered some of the darkest skies in the continental United States. The first telescope was erected in the late 1930s and much more has been added since.

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Today, the observatory offers a wide range of state-of-the-art instrumentation for imaging and spectroscopy; the 0.8 m Telescope, the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope, the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope, and the 10 m Hobby-Eberly Telescope; 1 m node of the globally networked Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT), one of two robotically controlled 1.2 m MOnitoring NEtwork of Telescopes (MONET), a 0.51 m telescope dedicated to optical aeronomy, and one of four globally networked Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) telescopes. The observatory also operates one of the first and most productive lunar ranging stations. Don’t ask what any of this means but it’s all very impressive to look at!

Heading west for a few more days and we found ourselves in Tucson, Arizona. There is a lot to see in the area and we were told temperatures rarely get into the 30’s. So, we decided to say here for the winter. That being said, the last two nights have been near freezing!

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Another attraction of Tucson is that Las Vegas is less than a one day drive. The Arizona state highway from Tucson to Vegas goes through beautiful desert and mountainous terrain and the scenery is spectacular.  This makes visiting my parents very easy and we traveled to them over Thanksgiving week. The food alone was worth the trip (just joking of course!). The Care Package my mother gave us to take back only lasted a few days. We plan to bring a bigger cooler next time.

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Day 81: The Case of the Missing Bloggers

We have been delinquent in our duties as bloggers. Time has flown by so fast over the past three weeks we haven’t had a chance to put it all in writing.

After leaving Mammoth Caves National Park in Kentucky, we headed to Scott Airforce Base just east of St. Louis. From here we staged several trips northwest of the city to St. Charles to see our son Thomas, our daughter-in-law Jess, and our three grandsons, Tyson, Desmond and Brady. It was our first time meeting Brady.

It was an exciting visit and fun to see how the three boys are developing. Tyson has become a studious four-year old who loves to do connect-the-dots and play with his dinosaurs. Desmond is a talkative and extremely active two-year old who is into everything. Two month old Brady has a full head of dark hair and was struggling to figure out when to sleep and how much to eat. He was baptized the last weekend we were in town and it was nice to be there for the ceremony.

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We took a side trip during our visit to Lake of the Ozarks Army Recreational Area. This lake stretches for miles and is very beautiful especially at sunset. The military recreation area was ideal. The campsites were large and there were dozens of cabins of all sizes for military personnel and their families to enjoy. There weren’t many cabins being used at the time because we visited during a school week.

We started heading south after leaving the St. Louis area. Our next destination was Eureka Springs, Arkansas. We camped only for one night to see a friend but will definitely be going back to this area. The topography is really interesting with winding roads, waterfalls, and clear pools of spring water. The town of Eureka Springs is a collage of old brick buildings clinging to hills and cliffs that’s occupied by a very laid-back artist community. A Corvette convention was just finishing as we came in and classic vets were all over the roads. It reminded us of our old 69’ Corvette Stingray and cruising around town looking large. Those were the days!

Next stop Eisenhower State Park on Lake Texoma. This park is located north of Dallas on the Texas side of the Texas-Oklahoma border. It’s another big winding lake that’s famous for its striped bass and large catfish (up to 100 pounds!). We didn’t catch any. The campground was empty because we were there during a school week.

We then ventured to Inks Lake State Park near Burnet, Texas. This is another nice lakeside park that caters to families and fishermen. Burnet is also where our daughter Ashley and son-in-law Jeremy live. We had a great time spending a day at the lake with our grandson, Canaan. We spoiled him rotten, of course. Canaan experienced putting a worm on a hook, fed the fish a few worms, caught a fish, went for hikes, experienced his first paddle boat ride and helped with the campfire (played with the campfire).

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Our next camping spot was in Daria’s mother’s driveway down near Corpus Christi. We were there for Amanda Matlock and Jimmy Stewart’s wedding. Amanda and Jimmy’s vision of their wedding was well thought out and put together. It was a lively crowd composed of family and biker friends. Our stunning daughter Ashley was a bridesmaid.

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We’re now in the Hill Country for another wedding this weekend.  It should be fun!

Day 54: Mammoth Caves

When first hearing of Mammoth Caves National Park years ago, I envisioned caverns filled with woolly mammoth remains. These large, hairy, elephant-like creatures with big tusks roamed the northern part of North America before becoming extinct in the last ice age. I thought this park was one of the their habitats. Daria and I visited the park last week to get the real story.

There are no mammoth bones, fossils or other remains in Mammoth Caves, and it’s unknown if a woolly mammoth ever stepped foot in the area. Mammoth in this usage means BIG, and this cave system is very big. In fact, it’s the longest known cave system in the world with more than 400 miles explored and many more miles yet to be explored. Early cave guide Stephen Bishop called the cave a “grand, gloomy and peculiar place” with its vast chambers and complex labyrinths earning it the name Mammoth. The National Parks Service (NPS) preserves the cave system and a part of the Green River valley and hilly country of south central Kentucky.

The caves have been formed in limestone over millions of years and they’re still growing. Water collects in hundreds of sink holes around central Kentucky before going down into the limestone beneath. Underground rivers carry the water to Green River, which is above ground but below the level of the underground rivers. As the riverbed erodes away over time, the underground rivers drop deeper into the earth. This process has left upper caverns and passageways hollow as shown in the diagram below. The system of caves this process left behind has been used by humans for thousands of years.

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The NPS offers several guided tours through different parts of the cave system. Daria and I took two tours over two days. Each tour required a bus ride to an entrance before descending down.

BThe first was the Domes & Dripstones Tour. We went in the New Entrance to Mammoth Cave and descended down approximately 280 stairs into a dramatic series of domes and pits. The tour continued through several large passages and a variety of dripstone formations. The highlight was a massive dripstone formation called Frozen Niagara. It’s was a great way to see the many faces of some of Mammoth Cave’s passage ways.

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One of the the park rangers who guided the tours highly recommended we do the Great Onyx Lantern Tour next. The Great Onyx cave was privately owned and operated until the 1960’s. The owners where very strict about tourists touching anything so the cave survived the so-called “cave wars” against vandalism. It emerged as one of the most pristine show caves in the region. We explored this beautifully decorated natural wonder by lantern light and got a different perspective on the multitudes of dripstone, gypsum, and helictite formations.

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Our visit to Mammoth Caves gave us a renewed appreciation of the great work the NPS is doing to preserve, protect and promote our natural wonders. The park system is an important part of our heritage that provides all visitors today and in the future with unique opportunities to learn, explore, or just relax. I also got a few ideas about what my next career might be!

Day 46: Happy Days Traveling

No house, no job, no worries! That’s the Vagabond lifestyle. Some people we’ve met have been doing this for more than five years. One couple we spoke with has been on the road for thirteen years and their RV isn’t much larger than our 19 foot trailer. We’ve been traveling for about six weeks and that makes us bona-fide rookies in Vagabond living.

Although we’re rookies, we’re getting a sense of what this lifestyle is all about beyond taking showers in confined spaces. There’s no social status in a Vagabond life. Success isn’t measured by the size of your camper and no one cares if you were the CEO of a Fortune 500 company or a part time attendant at the county dump. As one long-term traveler told me, “That was then and this is now.” This lifestyle is all about just being you.

The concept is best summed up by an old fisherman I met this week, “When you got more money than time, stop worrying ‘bout money and start fishin’!” Wiser words have never been spoken. What’s important is learning to bring happiness to yourself and to others in your life, whatever happiness means to you.

Recent experience has also confirmed there’s no correlation between wealth and how happy a person is. While helping my friend Cris Dosev run for US Congress last month, I banged on the front door of over one thousand houses; many were big and beautiful and others tiny and decrepit. Some of the warmest smiles came from people living in the worst conditions.

I’m not suggesting people with less are happier than people with more, I’m saying you can’t tell how happy a person is by the way they live. Research has confirmed this. Spontaneous answers to questions about current happiness provide no insight into a person’s economic status. Only after the person with less money thinks about their status for a while do they feel they’d be happier with more money.

This doesn’t happen everywhere, though. Some of the happiest people I’ve meet in my life was when I trekked around Mount Everest in the late 1990s. The local Nepalese and Tibetan villagers were dirt poor by Western standards, but everyone had big smiles on their faces and suicide was an unknown concept.

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Daria and I are just getting started with this lifestyle and it keeps getting better every day. We’ve already met some interesting people on our trip and we’ve probably reconnected with more friends and family than most people will do in a decade. Who knows how long we’ll be on the road or what our next adventure will bring – that’s the fun of being Vagabond!

 

Day 32: Not a Jimmie Buffett Hurricane

So far we’ve been able to stay ahead of a major storm coming up the East Coast. But it’s about to catch up to us. On Friday, we’ll be at a campground in Camp Lejune on the coast of NC and will experience our first hurricane in our little 19 foot trailer. Our scuba gear is ready. This will be interesting!
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Day 27: Fish Tremble at the Name Dosev

Nemo sent an urgent message to all the fish within 50 square miles of Pensacola Bay, “The Dosev brothers are coming! Quickly, swim deep into the ocean!” Some fish didn’t listen and they paid the ultimate price. They became fish tacos.

The Gulf Coast is a fisherman’s paradise. I was fortunate to spend one morning with two of the best fisherman in the area, Vincent and Cristov Dosev Jr. There’s nothing these two brothers enjoy more than motoring their 24 foot SeaHunt Triton out to a favorite fishing hole and catching a few big ones.

My instructions were to be at the marina no later than 5:30 AM. I arrived at 5:15 AM. The brothers were out on the town the night before so I figured they’d be late. Wrong. Not when it comes to fishing. They arrived at 5:20 along with their Bulgarian helper, Nickolai.

In no time the SeaHunt was in the water and Skipper Vince took the helm. Surf conditions were perfect – no chop and a 7 MPH breeze out of the east. The Gulf Coast sunrise was breathtaking as we motored out of Pensacola Bay.

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Our first fishing spot was 20 miles off the coast. We dropped anchor on sandy bottom about 100 feet deep and then dropped in a few lines to catch live bait. The Ruby Red Lip Grunts were very accommodating and we snagged a couple dozen in no time. Now the real fishing begins. Within a few minutes we hooked a 7-foot shark and another big fish that escaped at the last second. The Amberjack we were fishing for didn’t seem to be around, so we pulled anchor headed to another spot.

Pete Tide Wreck is a sunken tug boat sitting about 9 miles off the coast in 90 feet of water. Wrecks are a magnet for big fish because that’s where the little fish are. We cast our lines over the wreck and the fish took notice.

Our first strike was a 20 pound Amberjack. It was a nice fish and within the legal limit. The story is that I caught this fish, but like most fish tales, there was only an element of truth to the story. Cris hooked the fish and gave me the rod. Somehow I managed to reel it in without losing the fish or the rod.

Our biggest strike happened about an hour later. Nickolai hooked a 35 pound Cobia. This is an unusual catch because Cobia are typically running in the spring. Cris was ecstatic after we gaffed the fish and brought it aboard. In fact, I think he fell in love with it. You be the judge.

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The fish tacos were delicious. Lisa Dosev used a special seasoning. I had to look twice at the label to make sure I read it right. Thanks Lisa!

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The fishing expedition was a nice break from weeks of campaigning for Cris Dosev for US Congress. He’s a front-runner in the republican primary in this district. The election is Tuesday, and that means our stay in Pensacola is getting short. We’ll soon pack up and get on the road to visit Nick, our newly engaged son, Ashley, his fiancée, and Lani, our soon to be granddaughter. Daria and I will be feasting on Amberjack and Cobia along the way.

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The motley crew.

Day 20: A Short Military History of NAS Pensacola

Naval Air Station Pensacola is known as “The Cradle of Naval Aviation.” It is home to the Navy’s first flight school established in 1914. In keeping with the long tradition, all Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard aviators pass through Pensacola to receive their initial primary flight training. I went through primary here in 1981. NAS Pensacola is also home to the Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron – more commonly known as the Blue Angels – and home to the incredibly awesome Naval Aviation Museum.

The areas military importance didn’t begin in 1914 with the establishment of a flight school. It goes back much further and is important to the early history of the nation.

Spanish explorers discovered the strategic importance of Pensacola in early 1500s and established the first colony here in 1559. By 1698, Spain had built fort San Carlos de Austria. The fort changed hands a few times over the hundred years. It was besieged by native Indians in 1707 but not taken. The French took it 1719, and then British colonists took over in 1763 as part of a property exchange with France.

Spain sided with the American rebels during the Revolutionary War and recaptured the area and fort in 1781. They planned to stay for a while and by 1797 had completed San Carlos de Barrancas, a brick fortification. The British took San Carlos de Barrancas in the War of 1812 after the Spanish left it defenseless.

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Fort Barrancas on NAS Pensacola

The British subsequently abandoned the fortification. General Andrew Jackson found it in ruins in 1814 when he arrived with 4,000 troops. Jackson didn’t stay either. The Spanish returned to the site in 1817 and rebuilt Barrancas bigger and larger than it was before. That structure still stands today on NAS Pensacola property. Spain ceded the fort and all Western Florida to the United States in 1821. Jackson found himself in Pensacola again, this time as the territorial governor of Florida.

The area became a thriving shipbuilding community in 1825 with the opening of the Gulf Coast Navy Yard. This region is home to an abundance of live oaks that were used to build ships. This ultra-dense wood was used to build the USS Constitution, also known as Old Ironsides. No iron was used on the sides of Old Ironsides. The wood is so strong that cannon balls bounced off. The Naval Live Oaks Reservation near Gulf Breeze is a testament to this phenomenal resource. The land was purchased in 1828 by the U.S. government and is the only federal tree farm in existence.

The Civil war put Pensacola back into play in January 1861. Florida did not initially secede from the Union and confederate forces were moving in from the west. Fort Pickens was now the center of military defense for the area. It’s a massive fortification on the barrier island at the mouth of Pensacola Bay. Short on troops, Lieutenant Adam Slemmer spiked the cannons at Fort Barrancas to make them inoperable and consolidated his forces at Fort Pickens. That same day Florida seceded from the Union and Commodore James Armstrong surrendered the Navy Yard to the Confederacy.

Lieutenant Slemmer did not give into the confederates. He instead bombarded the mainland rendering the Navy Yard useless. A truce was put in place for a while, but in October 1861, Confederate forces unsuccessfully attacked Fort Pickens. Union forces seized Pensacola in the spring of 1862 and reinforced the fort. They held it until the end of the war.

The Navy closed the shipyard in 1911.  A hurricane in 1906 destroyed much of the shipyard and naval vessels in port as well as the nearby town of Woolsey where workers lived. Iron had also replaced live oak in shipbuilding by this time.

Pensacola had a resurrection in 1914 as the Pensacola Aeronautic Station. The navy recognized the importance of aircraft in naval warfare and established the base to train aviators. There were 38 naval aviators and 54 airplanes in Pensacola by the outbreak of WWI in 1916. Two years later, the base trained 1,000 aviators and housed hundreds of land based aircraft, seaplanes and balloons. During WWII, the based trained 1,100 aviators per month.

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NAS Pensacola in the 1940s

In June 1981, I arrived in Pensacola as a young Marine 2nd Lieutenant ready for initial flight training. After 18 months and a lot of hard work, Daria pinned on my wings of gold. Nearly 30 years later, Daria and I were privileged to pin those same set of wings on our son, Marine Captain “Nick” Ferri. It’s an honor for our family to be part of the rich heritage surrounding historic NAS Pensacola.

Day 15: Two Miracles in One Day

August 14: A Day to Remember

Miracles don’t occur very often. When two happen in one day it’s a miracle in itself. Yesterday was one of those days.

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The first miracle was Brady Gene Ferri coming into this world. Brady was born to our son Thomas and his wife Jess early in the morning in St. Louis. Daria’s earlier blog has all the details. We’re looking forward to meeting Brady and visiting with Thomas, Jess, Tyson and Desmond in mid-September.

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The second miracle happened upon Daria’s 85 year old mother, Marguerite Hoelscher. Marguerite was driving back from the market by herself on August 13 when she hit a curve and lost control. The car flipped 2 ½ times and ended up in a cotton field resting on the passenger’s side. The airbags deployed on initial impact, and she found herself dangling in her seat-belt when everything stopped.

Marguerite started dialing family members for help (she forgot to dial 911). A passing car stopped to help, made the 911 call and emergency vehicles were dispatched. Rescue workers had to use the Jaws of Life to cut her out of the car.

Miraculously, Marguerite had no serious injuries and was released from the hospital a few hours later. The Sheriff said a combination of a big car, airbags deploying, and a Guardian Angel saved her life.

Day 12: The Sun God is on Vacation

Wx-PcolaAugust 11: Ugh! Not a pretty picture

It’s been raining for two straight days and everything is soaked. There are big puddles all around our campsite and a small river is forming next to us. The extended forecast isn’t providing any hope. A low pressure area sitting in the Gulf is not expected to move for a week.

The dogs are curled up under the camper where it’s not too wet. They’d rather be inside the camper, but that’s not going to happen as far as I’m concerned. Daria is on the other side of that argument, which is not good for me. It means the camper will smell of wet dog pretty soon. In fact, as I write this she has gone outside to wipe off the mutts – and here they are.

It could be worse. We could have three dogs. It could be cold and windy. We could be in a tent like the people near us. We’re living high and dry and in luxury compared to tent camping in the rain.

We’re making the best of it all: reading, writing, napping. The dogs are happy now. Happy dogs, happy wife, happy life.

Day 11: On the Campaign Trail

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August 10: Helping a buddy get the country back on track

We stopped in Florida for the sun, beach, and if you can believe it, politics. We’re not here counting hanging chads – those of you remembering the Bush/Gore race know what I’m referring too – we’re here to help my good friend and former Marine aircrew Cris Dosev. He’s running as a republican candidate for US Congress in Florida’s 1st Congressional District.

Cris is a combat vet, father of eight children, staunch Christian and a small business owner. He and his wife Lisa are also Godparents to our daughter, Ashley Stewart. Cris has been extremely active in veteran causes and co-founded the Wounded Heroes Foundation. We need people like this representing us in Washington.

The field consists of seven republican candidates and Cris is right up at the top. His grass roots campaign is mostly self-funded and is powered by a small army of friends, former military members from all services, and family members including his eight children who claim at times to be slave labor.

The most serious contender is a young 34 year old lawyer and current state representative. His multi-millionaire daddy is a former state senator and well known in local politics. Daddy not only helps junior fund his campaign, he’s gotten him out of a DUI and helped him cover-up 17 motor vehicle citations. Do we really need another silver spoon in Washington?

The primary election is on August 30. It will be decided by popular vote. Whoever wins the republican primary will likely win the general election because the district is heavily republican.

I’ve never helped on a political campaign before so I didn’t know what to expect on the first day. I was given a t-shirt and a stack of brochures, and piled into a car with three other people. I sat shotgun because I was the old guy. Cris’s son was the driver and head list master. He detailed data on every neighborhood in the district where known republican primary voters lived.

Our mission is to find voter’s homes, ring their doorbells, and talk with anyone who answered. We did this for eight hours in 95 degree heat and 90 percent humidity. This swelter was occasionally broken up by a torrential downpour. By the day’s end, our team had visited 600 homes and spoke with approximately 300 people. I spoke with about 100 would be voters.

You may be thinking: What does a republican voter look like and where do they live? Here is my observation. Voting republicans are old and they are young; working, unemployed, and retired; some live in huge mansions and others in trailer homes; many are well-educated and others are not; they are single, married and divorced; some have children; many have dogs and some have many dogs; the majority are white and mostly straight as far as I could tell; and most everyone was friendly and interested in the election.

I only had one bad experience. A guy called me a politician, told the young child standing next to him that all politicians are sleazebags, and slam their door in my face. This likely happened because I wanted to find out how good the list was by visiting a few few houses not on the list. Bottom line: the list is good – believe the list.

More campaign trail stories to follow.

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